Author Topic: Class offerings  (Read 2263 times)

Linda W. Anderson

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Re: Class offerings
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2013, 05:39:29 PM »
On a related issue, Ezri is definitely now in semi-retirement (I say semi because she still loves to run) and is only running Tunnelers and Hoopers from now on.   Dax is also limited to those 2 classes.  My issue with trials that have two of the same class (other than regular) on the same day is it limits what my semi-retired older dogs can enter.   Given the choice, I prefer to enter each of them in one or two classes per day but not the same two classes.  For example Tunnelers and Hoopers on one day and Tunnelers on the second day.   It definitely has an influence on which trials I enter.
Linda

And I am betting that if you took them for a brisk walk around the trial grounds (as much time as you would commit to walking a course, standing in line and running them) that those older dogs would be just as happy or maybe even more so to have that special time with you that is "all about them".  I know that when I see the 12-15 year old dogs, I sure watch them closely and wonder if they really should still be in the ring or if they should be enjoying a special walk each day.

JMHO

Sharon
Very good point, Sharon.  Thanks for the input.
Linda
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Sharon Nelson

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Re: Class offerings
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2013, 05:54:52 PM »
On the topic of older dogs running, I have a question and I would like your input, Sharon.  Someone told me (I don't remember who right now) that the tunnelers class is one of the hardest on older dogs.  I'm not sure why that conclusion was reached.  I can only guess it might be  because of the turns in tunnels or running on the tunnel ribs???  I'd be interested to know.  Whisk will be 11 in May, and still loves to run.  I will enter him in no more than 3 runs a day, with at least 1 of the runs being without jumps.  I always thought tunnelers would be easier on his body, but maybe I'm wrong.  I also don't enter him in weavers anymore due to his history of carpal injuries.  I also am careful about running him this time of year because I have no access to any kind of agility conditioning.  Once Ted's dog trail firms up enough so he's not punching through, I can take him on walks, but that's about it.
Any and all input is welcome!
Thanks!
Shirley

That is TOTALLY dependent upon the individual dog, their temperament and their structure.  If the dog runs with a bit of recklessness or with too much enthusiasm when they see a ring full of tunnels, then Tunnelers might not be the best choice for the older dog.  Another dog it might be Jumpers, another Touch N Go.

If your dog starts to have an adrenaline rise because of the particular obstacle (or agility in general) then their pain threshold also rises and they will not take care of themselves then if they enter the ring without a rise in adrenaline. 

For some dogs, Tunnelers is by far the best class for them as they are older.......... for others it is Jumpers.

There is NO answer, it is all about the individual dog.

Since the one dog died in the tunnel at an International event, tunnels are really starting to get a bad rap about their safety and many people are really coming up with personal opinions about the safety of tunnels.  As it turned out, the tunnel had nothing to do with the dog's passing, as he had a massive heart failure and he happened to go down in the tunnel.  It has a lot more to do with the massive high the dog was on during the previous 5-6 obstacles when he was running quite crazed like.

If you dog runs like a rapid rabbit through the tunnels, then I would cut back to only the few tunnels seen within the mix of the other classes.  If they SLAM onto the A-frame, then I would cut back on Touch N Go first.  If they have a bad jumping style, then cut out Jumpers first and maybe not run Regular if there is an excess of jumps in a particular round.  If they move the weave pole while weaving then Weavers would be cut out first.

For each individual dog there will be obstacles that are "better" or "worse" for them to take in repetition.  That will be based on their temperament, conformation, the way in which they personally perform each obstacle and also maybe the running surface of the trials you attend.  But there is no general guidelines that cover all dogs.  I have had two dogs that Weavers was by far the best class for them.  They remained supple (they NEVER slammed a weave pole in their lives) and weaving was the best exercise for them to keep them flexible and moving freely. 

You have to reach your own conclusions based on your own dog and their personality, build and obstacle performance.

Sharon
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Shirley Wallace

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Re: Class offerings
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2013, 06:07:07 PM »
Thank you Sharon!  Your answer helped a lot.  I need to go back and watch some of Whisk's recent runs on video and watch more carefully for what he's doing with his body.
Shirley
Shirley Wallace

Lisa Schmit In The Zone Agility

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Class offerings
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2013, 06:49:11 PM »
two of the best things to do to decide on when/ what classes to retire your dog is to videotape your runs/practice and try very hard to watch with open eyes....what are u seeing?  Does something just look funny???? Are they taking jumps weird???.  Do they stumbled across the dog walk?? You don't have to be an expert on dog structure to ."see" and "feel" if something looks "off"

And ask your friends for honest opinions.....and be ready for their truthful answer.   I will always tell the truth when it comes to dogs running.....so don't ask me if you don't want to hear my honest opinion.   Last trial I had a person ask me about their bonus attempt and I told her she did absolutely nothing right!!  I explained what I was talking about and she agree with me and thanked me for my honesty ...

Moxie's last year of competition I kept asking my good friends if they saw anything "off".  Paula goss kept telling me to really pAy attention to the dog walk...how does he look on walk.....   I really watched jumping..but didn't really watch how he did the walk...but now I watch dogs on the dog walk.   Do they look "off" do they look unbalanced? Do they look they are going to fall off?  Do they fall off??

Lynn--  I know u started this thread just about letting clubs know what you as an exhibitor likes...and I appreciate that.  But it definitely has morphed into a different topic which was no aimed at you in any way. But still a very important topic to discuss.
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Lin Battaglia

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Class offerings
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2013, 09:08:40 PM »
Sorry....about the previous if it went thru....my puppy jumped in my lap. This subject did go off topic a little. But it's good to remember that not every dog will have the skills for every class. Not every dog should have a NATCH, some not a VERS NATCH and shouldn't just because they stay at it for 10-12+ years. The value is there because a NATCH/VERS NATCH it is hard to attain. Set goals that are achievable and bask in the small successes too. I mentioned recently in another subject post, "when it's all done and over, it's the DOG you miss not the ribbons and awards. The dog's welfare should come first. Ask your friends, ask your trainer but be ready to say thank you and listen.

LinB
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marycallaway

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Re: Class offerings
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2013, 11:47:21 PM »
On the topic of older dogs running, I have a question and I would like your input, Sharon.  Someone told me (I don't remember who right now) that the tunnelers class is one of the hardest on older dogs.  I'm not sure why that conclusion was reached.  I can only guess it might be  because of the turns in tunnels or running on the tunnel ribs???  I'd be interested to know.  Whisk will be 11 in May, and still loves to run.  I will enter him in no more than 3 runs a day, with at least 1 of the runs being without jumps.  I always thought tunnelers would be easier on his body, but maybe I'm wrong.  I also don't enter him in weavers anymore due to his history of carpal injuries.  I also am careful about running him this time of year because I have no access to any kind of agility conditioning.  Once Ted's dog trail firms up enough so he's not punching through, I can take him on walks, but that's about it.
Any and all input is welcome!
Thanks!
Shirley


I run a male Doberman who is 27.5 at the withers and 90#.   I believe the tunnel is difficult for a dog around his size due to the tunnel being only 24" at the 12 o'clock position then moving down lower so that any dog close to my dog's size has to scrunch down to run through it.  That's hard on a dog.  I'd love to see a larger tunnel so that the bigger dogs aren't forced into that position repeatedly.

Lin Battaglia

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Re: Class offerings
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2013, 09:09:32 AM »
Hi Shirley,
In my humble opinion what seems to cause risk of injury to the older dogs in tunnels is their eye sight. It becomes dim with their clouded eyes so they have trouble seeing a bend in a tunnel. Then add in a fast dog  and you have a crash. Worst thing that ever happened to Tunnelers was "dark" tunnels. With a dark tunnel on a curve you risk injuries. Of course care also needs to be taken to bag/strap them correctly.

LinB
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