Author Topic: altitude  (Read 552 times)

DebbieP

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altitude
« on: July 19, 2016, 08:01:59 AM »
It'll be my first time in Utah.  I know South Jordan's altitude is higher than where I live, so I'm curious to hear from folks who live at lower altitudes and have gone to Champs before in South Jordan if they've experienced difficulties.  And, more importantly, what steps (besides drinking more water and taking potassium) one can do to counter the effects?

And, more importantly, if the dogs experience difficulties (especially older dogs - since I'll be bringing two non-participating older dogs). 

Thanks so much!

--Debbie Potter
« Last Edit: July 19, 2016, 08:11:14 AM by DebbieP »
Debbie in Louisville KY with
Dylan the BC and Java Joe the amped-up All American

Rsquared

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Re: altitude
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2016, 01:33:26 PM »
I was concerned about the altitude before I went to my first Champs in Utah because I live at sea level.  However, the elevation wasn't high enough to be a problem and my dog was fine. 

I have never trialed at Mammoth in the Eastern Sierras because I know I would not fare well at that altitude.  Too bad, because it's such a pretty place and I've heard such great things about that trial.
Ronni in San Diego with Scooter, Ollie & Xtra Crispy (R.I.P. Sage)

Karen Birdsong

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Re: altitude
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2016, 03:32:04 PM »
South Jordan is about 4, 330 ft.   In the past I did not notice any effect of the altitude on my dogs and do not expect it with my younger dog this year.  This is my first trip with a competition double digit dog.  Perhaps someone who has competed with a DD dog can share their experience. 

Do not under estimate the importance of proper hydration.  It seems at almost every Champs I’ve been to at Gillette, Wyoming (4,554 ft) and So Jordan, Utah, (4,330 ft) someone ended up visiting the ER due to dehydration sneaking up on them.   Yours truly suffered a mini-stroke during a Champs run in 2014, probably due to dehydration…even though I was trying to stay on top of it.   

I’m 65, and while in good health I’m in poor physical condition…just lazy.  I anticipate my lack of conditioning, far more than the altitude, will affect my ability to master the big courses at Champs.  Sharon, has not pity for us “seniors”…LOL. 

BTW I do go to Mammoth each year and highly recommend it.  Mammoth is a very dog friendly area, hosted by a great club at a beautiful site that is around 7,000 ft in elevation.  But I would also recommend that low-landers try to go up a couple of days early to help the human half of the team to acclimate.  My guess is that the dogs are pretty well adjusted to handle the short runs within 24 hours of arriving at the site.     
Karen Birdsong,
and the Aussie boys..TJ and Monte

DeafSheltieMom

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Re: altitude
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2016, 04:35:42 PM »
I also live at sea level in SoCal, and have yearly traveled to both Mammoth Lakes (approx elevation 7100') and Prescott, AZ (approx elevation 5100') for trials, and Champs in 2012 in South Jordan.  My older dog (now 11.5 yrs young) doesn't seem to be affected by the altitude at all.  If anything, he seemed to run faster at those trials... go figure.  I do arrive early (at least 1-2 days ahead of time, sometimes 3) to acclimate all of us.  We go on many short hikes and walks everyday to get us all breathing.  And, do NOT neglect hydrating, a lot!!!  If anything, drinking lots of water makes the most difference in preventing altitude illness. 

But every person (and dog) reacts differently to changes in altitude.  Just because I (and my dogs) are fine, doesn't mean you will be.  Just make sure you monitor yourself and your dogs, and don't overdo, especially when you first arrive.  My 2 cents...

Oh, also, if you have sleep apnea and use a CPAP, make sure you adjust your machine for altitude.  My hubby had a heck of a time when he traveled with me to Mammoth a few years ago, since he didn't realize how much the high altitude would affect him.  Some people with apnea need to take a prescription drug to help them oxygenate in the high altitude.  Discuss this with your doctor before you leave for Champs!  The altitude at South Jordan isn't as severe as Mammoth, but it never hurts to check.
-dayle
-Dayle Shimamura
 Mom to Alva, Hutch and Tesla

DebbieP

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Re: altitude
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2016, 11:29:11 AM »
Thanks for your responses, Ronni, Karen, and Dayle!

---Debbie with Dylan and Java Joe in Louisville
Debbie in Louisville KY with
Dylan the BC and Java Joe the amped-up All American