Author Topic: DRI Question  (Read 841 times)

TeamHeavyMetal

  • **
  • Posts: 19
DRI Question
« on: October 21, 2019, 06:58:21 PM »
Hi y'all:

I have a question.  I saw the uploaded results for the Champs runs, as well as the trials I competed in Sept.  In prep for Champs, I entered my dog in Elite Regular for the first time.  I gained a Q and noticed that under the DRI column, it stated the numbers 63.49.  Can someone tell me what this means?

5   C   EAS   5      9/7/2019   63.49         Karen''s Canine Companions Sep-19   Merged

Thanks in advance! (PS: I understand that DRI has to do with how fast your dog runs as compared to other dogs that have also run in that division, but I don't understand what those specific numbers mean in relation to that?  My dog ran faster than 63%?  My dog ran a course in 63 seconds? Any help is appreciated!)

Carolynn and Six

Ed and Dino

  • **
  • Posts: 187
Re: DRI Question
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2019, 07:52:21 PM »
What the Handbook says about DRI is below.
Based on that I'd say a 63 means your dog is a bit better than average in speed, lots of upward potential.

Dogs Run Index

At the Elite level classes, NADAC calculates what is called a dogs run index. The dogs run index (DRI) tells each competitor how their dog performed in that class when compared to the average performance of all the other dogs in that class and jump height over the past year. Runs that are fast and efficient will have higher run index (DRI) scores than otherwise. The DRI is only computed for Elite level classes. The numbers are computed as closely as possible so that dogs that run within the top 7% of all dogs in a class will earn a DRI of 100 or higher. This indicates the fastest dogs in a class that participate in the NADAC program in North America and Australia. A run index in the 90s indicates a very fast dog and a run index in the 80s indicates a well above average speed dog.

Many handlers use the run index numbers to access their dogs performance. They can evaluate if their dog is improving and gaining confidence with their agility skills and a handler can also use the run index numbers to maybe indicate that the dog is sore if their numbers start dropping with no other obvious reason. Sometimes before dogs are lame, they will slow down a bit and protect their bodies, resulting in a slower run index from what is normal for them. So handlers use the run index numbers
for many different purposes.
Ed & Tres
Dino (At the Bridge)
Morristown, NJ

Off Course Agility Podcast
available on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher and Anchor

Chris Nelson

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2161
Re: DRI Question
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2019, 09:46:32 AM »
It is a 'gauge' of sorts on how fast your dog is running.

Common misconception is that it's based off each specific course, on each weekend, which isn't true.      The DRI numbers are in the exhibitors handbook, and are only updated when needed.   They were last updated in 2017 I believe, and there has been no need to update them again since the dogs are all still running in that same range.   

Easiest way to think about it is you have a goal of let's say 5.45 Yards Per Second (YPS) in Elite Regular, if you're jumping 20 inches.

If you hit that goal exactly, then you would receive a 100 DRI.

If you fall short by a small amount, let's say 5.40 YPS you would get a 99 DRI.

And anything above that goal gets you a higher number, so 5.70 YPS would be a 104 DRI.

It is capped at 111, so you can't ever get a DRI higher then 111

Chris Nelson

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2161
Re: DRI Question
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2019, 09:47:50 AM »
I know a lot of folks like to use the DRI numbers to compare how their dog does on different surfaces, temperatures and the big one is as they get older.

For instance if I had a dog that consistently ran in the 90 DRI range, and then they started really slowing down and dropping into the 70's, it could be a possible sign they are getting a bit too tired for my taste.   But that is all handler dependent

TeamHeavyMetal

  • **
  • Posts: 19
Re: DRI Question
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2019, 09:56:54 AM »
Thank you Chris. These are excellent examples.  I was always so confused on that. Now my goal is to try and get him faster.  I have an Australian Shepherd and it really excites me that he is even in the 60's.  Although, that was his first time ever running Elite...so hoping we both get more comfortable and his speeds will improve.  From what I have seen in general, most Australian Shepherds don't run that fast in agility.  And it saddens me.  They are a working breed and should be every bit as tenacious in this sport as the Border Collies are.  Just with a different running style due to build. So it makes me happy to even see him listed here. I would LOVE to eventually see stats on the current fastest Aussies running in agility right now and see how he compares. 

I know we all have different goals for our team and our dogs and our personal performance. Speed is one of those things that keep me charged for the game.  If I can handle a tough course clean at top speeds, that is such a rush!  I love my boy and how hard he works for me.

Thanks again for your explanation.

Carolynn and Six