NADAC Forum

General => General Discussion => Topic started by: sherkelly on December 29, 2015, 02:31:21 PM

Title: Tunnel Bags
Post by: sherkelly on December 29, 2015, 02:31:21 PM
We use the water bags for our tunnels  would  like to  use some kind of snubber instead  does  anyone  have  any  suggestions.

Thanks

Sherry Kelly
Kern Canine Activities
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Janice_Shavor on December 30, 2015, 08:28:27 AM
Look at Tunnel Snuggers, made by Genuine Dog Gear.  They are sold as individual straps, so you need 2 per tunnel.

I have decided that securing tunnels is a lot like dealing with autumn leaves.  You can rake leaves, blow leaves, or mulch leaves.  All methods end up taking about the same amount of time; just which do you dislike the least?

Tunnel sand bags don't need refilling but take a lot of storage space and weight if on an equipment trailer.  Tunnel bags of water need the time to fill and drain.  Tunnel snuggers need staking.  You can use up to 4 stakes per snugger depending on surface conditions.  I don't like staking but don't have room for sand filled bags and don't want to fill and empty water bags.  I did get washers so I use a stake with washer over the snugger loop to make it easier on the loop and me to get the stake out of the ground.  My agility area is grass.

Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: James Bell on December 30, 2015, 05:30:02 PM
As someone who has been a course builder for 16 years and a judge often without the assistance  of a dedicated tunnel setter, I'd like to add to the tradeoffs.

Snugglers work ok, depending on the ground into which you put your stakes. Hard and/or clay based soils you will want to use long masonry screws and battery powered drills. If you don't have several drills and a means to charge them during the day, your course builders will be quitting you by midday. It is back breaking on your knees work. Building a tunnelers course with these on a warm day will likely cause a full blown mutiny. But for dogs, they move similarly to the rest of the tunnel. That can be good for safety but lead to dogs thinking they can blow through them sideways all the time.

Sand bags are handy and easy and hold but are heavy and difficult to haul. They also can be like hitting a brick wall for the dogs compared to the snuggers. They may hit them hard the first time, they won't the rest of the day, one way or the other.

Water bags are easier on the dogs, as easy to handle as sand bags and store and haul as easily as the snuggers. The only catch is the necessary water supply and a scale to ensure you get the right and consistent poundage. That's about 2.25 gallons per bag, 4.5 gallons per tunnel end.

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Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: AgilityJeff on January 01, 2016, 11:52:07 AM
We use water bags here at Dogwood Acres as well and 'measure' them to full by putting the sandbag / bladder in a 2 gallon "planter" pot ... when the wateris at the top of the pot, we're done.  The flexibility of the bags is ideal for us, but when it comes to taking the show on the road (we hosted several events off the property this year) I was REALLY wishing we used Tunnel Snuggers like back in the day when we were getting started.

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Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Janice_Shavor on January 02, 2016, 05:39:18 AM
I must admit that I do not enjoy staking and unstaking at trials and much prefer to use tunnel bags (water filled).  My back yard agility field the tunnel snuggers are easier to use (grass, not packed clay).
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Chris Nelson on January 02, 2016, 12:14:01 PM
Genuine dog gear makes a pretty nice snuggler.     I was skeptical at first, but I have used them at a few different trials.   Outdoors on grass and indoors on dirt, and they have done really well.
I do use drills with a 3/8" x 8" lag screw.

I have also ordered a set of tunnel bags from Salty dog.   They look really nice and have heard a lot of great things about them.   They are pricey though.

https://www.genuinedoggear.com/GDE-TSNUG.html (https://www.genuinedoggear.com/GDE-TSNUG.html)
http://www.saltydogcanvas.com/tunnelbags.aspx (http://www.saltydogcanvas.com/tunnelbags.aspx)
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Sarah Fix on January 15, 2016, 05:15:35 PM
Has anyone used these from Salty Canvas?

http://www.saltydogcanvas.com/TCtunnelbags.aspx

They already have water bladders in them and have extra wide straps covering two struts.  They are elongated and tuck in next to the tunnel.  We need more bags and were wondering if anyone recommended these?

Sarah
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Lynn in VT on January 15, 2016, 06:04:52 PM
Hi Sarah --

I have used these.  I like the idea of them, but I find them awkward to handle. My small (and weak!) hands struggle with aligning everything before attaching the broad "strap" across the top; and then I struggle with aligning and securing the velcro across the top.  I've only used them once, so maybe it will get better with practice...

Lynn
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Chris Nelson on January 15, 2016, 07:19:17 PM
I just ordered a full set.  We'll see how they work in the real world, but I like them well enough.

They are a little lighter than I'm used to, so that will be curious to see if the shape makes up for it.

I did get the one piece strap version, that may have been a really good idea or it could backfire spectacularly if they don't fit my tunnels well enough.

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Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Karen Echternacht on January 16, 2016, 02:48:30 PM
Looking for feedback please....  I presume that the best option for a grass field, that the bags can stay full year round, without having to travel with them, would be sand filled tunnel bags?

Someone once mentioned having multiple smaller ziplocks of sand inside each bag to prevent them from feeling like concrete.  Has anyone utilized this method?
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Richard Wolfe on January 16, 2016, 03:59:06 PM
Looking for feedback please....  I presume that the best option for a grass field, that the bags can stay full year round, without having to travel with them, would be sand filled tunnel bags?

Someone once mentioned having multiple smaller ziplocks of sand inside each bag to prevent them from feeling like concrete.  Has anyone utilized this method?

Karen, I'm thinking Sharon had given out that info.  If I'm correct, I'm sure it's well tested.
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Janice_Shavor on January 16, 2016, 04:22:23 PM
We had to mend and refill sand bags used on the training field.  We used the quart bags and a bathroom scale on fill each and that is working well for us.  There is an older email somewhere that has the weight requirement.
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Linda W. Anderson on January 16, 2016, 05:59:20 PM
We use trash compactor bags inside the vinyl tunnel bags.  22 lbs. of sand  They are stored in a shed when not in use.
Linda
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Lynn in VT on January 16, 2016, 06:17:58 PM
Someone once mentioned having multiple smaller ziplocks of sand inside each bag to prevent them from feeling like concrete.  Has anyone utilized this method?

This is what I've done.  I do think it's not as good as water-filled, but better than one solid bag of sand.  It also allows me to easily remove or add in weight, depending on need. 

Lynn
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Sharon Nelson on January 16, 2016, 09:32:03 PM
Yep, for a stationary situation I much prefer the water filled bags and in fact, it is all I use.

I have use the small bags of sand and that worked second best.  By having many small bags of sand, they move around better, instead of the dogs instead one large solid bag of sand.

Sharon
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Chris Nelson on January 18, 2016, 11:46:24 AM
Got my tunnels today so I tested out the fitment of the one piece straps.  I like them a lot!

They fit incredibly well, not loose or too tight.

I was concerned since tunnels aren't known for being the most accurate objects in the world.   But they hold the tunnel really well.




(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/01/18/35cd438256d5d5c7b1cc9924cd1a4ed7.jpg)



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Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Jean Sather (McCreight) on January 18, 2016, 01:43:34 PM
Chris, what are they like for carrying?  I've always liked the pairs that separate into single bags with handles, since my limit is 20-25 lbs per hand (sometimes not even that!  :)
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Chris Nelson on January 18, 2016, 01:53:44 PM
I would need to measure to be exact.  But I would guess around 25 lbs per bag.  I can put them on a scale later tonight to be sure though :)

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Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Jean Sather (McCreight) on January 18, 2016, 02:05:32 PM
Was wondering more about how you carry them with the one-piece strap.  I've always found it rather difficult to carry two tunnel bags that are connected since my knees keep bumping into the strap (if that makes any sense)....  We occasionally have volunteers who will just pick up a pair of 25 lb tunnel bags (connected) and haul fifty lbs in each hand (or slung over their shoulders), but not a lot of middle-aged + women are capable of that ......  :)
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Shirlene Clark on January 18, 2016, 02:27:50 PM
I got one set of these bags sent to Australia and I like them a lot.  They are kinder to the tunnels having a wide band.  They hold the tunnel just right with the right amount of tension.  Eliminates the element of people velcroing the tunnel too tight or too loose.  Yes they are more difficult to carry with the strap....  However it it is not a problem if you use a yard cart....if you don't use a yard cart the easiest way is two people...one bag side each with the strap spanning between them.  I envisage huge daisy chains of ring crew and bags *lol*    I do like them.
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Sharon Nelson on January 18, 2016, 05:40:46 PM
I got one set of these bags sent to Australia and I like them a lot.  They are kinder to the tunnels having a wide band.  They hold the tunnel just right with the right amount of tension.  Eliminates the element of people velcroing the tunnel too tight or too loose.  Yes they are more difficult to carry with the strap....  However it it is not a problem if you use a yard cart....if you don't use a yard cart the easiest way is two people...one bag side each with the strap spanning between them.  I envisage huge daisy chains of ring crew and bags *lol*    I do like them.

We think alike Shirlene!  I tell people that they MUST use a cart (we have five of the little gardening carts) or they MUST use two people!  I want my workers to be able to last the whole weekend and not be sore!  Our workers all seem to be in the 55+ (and lots in the 63+) age groups!

Sharon
Title: Re: Tunnel Bags
Post by: Janice_Shavor on January 19, 2016, 06:53:26 AM
I find it just amazing how my personal view of my age group changes as time passes.  For a number of years, I have regarded myself on the upper edge of "middle age"  ... and still think that way.  I am retired from chief course builder (twice at least) and will move some tunnel bags but not lots of them.