Author Topic: Canine Color Vision  (Read 826 times)

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Canine Color Vision
« on: January 09, 2013, 08:47:47 AM »
This topic came up on NADAC yahoo group, so I dug up my notes on Canine Color Vision.  As a visual artist, this topic interests me greatly. For those of you equally interested in this topic, there is a lot of information on my blog (see link below). For those of you who are not that interested, in general Canine color vision is similar to human Red/Green color blindness which translates into dogs seeing blue and yellow very well.  Red and green look rather brown-ish.  I make mental notes about the color of tunnels when walking courses as I believe yellow and blue tunnels are more likely to “suck in” a dog  than say a red or green tunnel, especially if the tunnel is part of a contact/ tunnel discrimination.

Here is a link to my blog entry with notes on Canine Color Vision:

http://artanddogblog.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/canine-color-vision/

Devorah Sperber, Woodstock, NY

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Re: Canine Color Vision
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2013, 06:53:58 AM »
Here is something I didn't know about canine vision.  The link below was emailed to me by a friend who runs Pugs (Tracey T.).   The article talks the effects of eye shape and nose length on vision and also presents some interesting ideas about why some dogs may be more motion sensitive than others (even within the same breed). The implications are broad!  Fascinating stuff!

http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s953902.htm

Devorah Sperber,Jake, and Lil (long-nosed Australian Terriers) :)

Re: Canine Color Vision
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2013, 07:52:58 AM »
This is good stuff. I also read an study that said that dogs without the visual streak were the one who are able to watch TV and make out images.  and it is not breed specific.  My Male Gizmo will watch TV my lap top even  my phone if animals are on. My female Gabby has never even glanced at the screen. How does this come into play in agility? I have notice Gabby is much better at picking up body cues on the edges of her visual field than is Gizmo. I wonder if dogs who are better at working at a distance have visual steak type of eyes. Ie they see more from a wider field?  Also Is there a test that a owner could do to determine which type a dogs has.

Here is something I didn't know about canine vision.  The link below was emailed to me by a friend who runs Pugs (Tracey T.).   The article talks the effects of eye shape and nose length on vision and also presents some interesting ideas about why some dogs may be more motion sensitive than others (even within the same breed). The implications are broad!  Fascinating stuff!

http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s953902.htm

Devorah Sperber,Jake, and Lil (long-nosed Australian Terriers) :)
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 08:13:33 AM by Dave Worldsbesjrts Dad »
It not the dogs fault stupid!

Re: Canine Color Vision
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2013, 08:10:12 AM »
It not the dogs fault stupid!

TheQuestKnight

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Re: Canine Color Vision
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2013, 12:54:34 PM »
Very interesting . . .

Based on what I've learned from our dogs' opthamologists and from owners of working stock dogs (mostly BCs), I'll toss this out for consideration, for whatever it's worth to anyone . . .

Our canine opthamologists have indicated to us that dogs that are more dependent on their sight for their bred function, such as sighthounds, have the highest percentage of color "cones" in the retina compared to the black & white "rods" . . . herding, hunting and working breeds have the next highest percentage of "cones" . . .

From discussions with owners of herding and hunting breeds, these dogs seem to be keenly aware of things in their peripheral vision, because that is where threats to the herd that they are charged with protecting . . . or game animals/birds' movements may be detected . . . which may be one reason that seemingly so many of these breeds initially struggle with the "Hobday Square" challenge on a course . . .

I really have NO idea what dogs actually see, but I do know that with our visually challenged BC boy, Dred, you can put out as many different colored toys in a room and tell him to bring you "the GREEN one" . . . and he'll select the green toy 95+% of the time . . .

. . . and our BC girl, Gael, has the same tendencies with orange toys; but only around 75% accuracy in choosing that color toy from an assortment . . .

My wife and I have also partnered with agility dogs "hazy" eyes, cataracts, no peripheral vision and "splotchy" retinal damage . . . and they all seem quite capable of doing almost everything required to perform agility safely, correctly and "in prescribed time" . . . provided our handling has been modified to all that they require from us . . .

Perhaps, in time, scientific advances will permit opthamologists to tap into the electrical impulses from the dog's optic nerve to the dog's brain and translate them into a visual matrix that we can see . . . that would be AWESOME!

In the meantime, I guess that I try to avoid thinking too much about how my kids see . . . I only know that they see pretty well as youngsters . . . and as they age, their vision declines . . . similar to the way that ours does . . . yet they adapt to the changes without spectacles much better than we do! <G>

Hugs & wags,

Al, Barb, Dred (the severely visually challenged boy that sees greens well), Gael (the orange gal) & Pelli 
Castle Camelot: Al, Barb, Dred, Gael & Pellinore . . . and from The Bridge Grill & Pub,  Kali, Flurry, Promise, Chico, Romulus, Trix and Tony.