Author Topic: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors  (Read 8348 times)

ScottDillard

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Re: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors
« Reply #30 on: November 19, 2013, 08:18:18 AM »
On the lighter side, I made a video of my overexcitable corgi's start line problems when he was young (be sure sound is on - no barking involved):    

Ashley Huffman

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Re: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors
« Reply #31 on: December 18, 2013, 10:59:54 AM »
On the lighter side, I made a video of my overexcitable corgi's start line problems when he was young (be sure sound is on - no barking involved):

Thank you for sharing.  My Schnoodle and I are still in our first year of competing, so seeing this video makes me feel better and know that we are not alone  :)
Ashley Huffman
Union Bridge, MD

Lissie the Schnoodle

bill fehn

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Re: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2013, 01:56:35 PM »
Ashley,

I hope you are making videos of your practices and your runs. There are many reasons for doing so.  One indirect benefit I found is when I am struggling working on something new, is to look back at our older efforts and see how far we have advanced. It puts the current issues in prospective and makes have a positive attitude about the future easier.

Good luck,

Bill Fehn

Lin Battaglia

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Re: Start line probelms
« Reply #33 on: December 21, 2013, 09:50:05 AM »
If I can offer a training suggestion. Some of the dogs may run beautifully after they get away from the start line....but they have very bad impulse control. So go back to your beginning training and do everything in small increments. Using only one hoop or jump, with the leash on the dog, walk to the obstacle, stand up straight and be calm. Let the dog know you have a treat. Tell the dog to sit and give the treat, then turn and walk away from the obstacle. Repeat the same thing but this time touch the collar/leash, don't take it off, give the treat and walk away. The dog NEVER gets the first obstacle. Gradually build on this so that everytime the dog goes to the line, he thinks he will get a treat and he must control his impulses and focus on you. Grow this by starting to remove the leash, give the treat and then put leash back on and walk the dog away from the first obstacle. When you get to where you can remove the leash and walk past the first obstacle, immediately turn and go back to the dog, put the leash on, give the treat and walk away. The dog at this point still never gets the first obsatcle. This process could take weeks. For the handler, it also helps to claim the space as you walk away from the dog, cross in front of the dog between the first obstacle and the dog, keeping the front of your body facing the dog (keeping eye contact). Keep telling the dog to stay. Stand still and go back again, leash on treat and walk away. Eventually you will let the dog come to you (face the direction you will be going), taking the first obstacle and getting a treat. PUT THE LEASH ON AND WALK AWAY> Have fun with this, it takes time to train. The dog will mirror you and your own excitment, be calm and be relaxed.

LinB
mdt-Agility Ability LLC
Nevada

Yvette Cook

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Re: Start line probelms
« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2014, 08:26:41 PM »
If I can offer a training suggestion. Some of the dogs may run beautifully after they get away from the start line....but they have very bad impulse control. So go back to your beginning training and do everything in small increments. Using only one hoop or jump, with the leash on the dog, walk to the obstacle, stand up straight and be calm. Let the dog know you have a treat. Tell the dog to sit and give the treat, then turn and walk away from the obstacle. Repeat the same thing but this time touch the collar/leash, don't take it off, give the treat and walk away. The dog NEVER gets the first obstacle. Gradually build on this so that everytime the dog goes to the line, he thinks he will get a treat and he must control his impulses and focus on you. Grow this by starting to remove the leash, give the treat and then put leash back on and walk the dog away from the first obstacle. When you get to where you can remove the leash and walk past the first obstacle, immediately turn and go back to the dog, put the leash on, give the treat and walk away. The dog at this point still never gets the first obsatcle. This process could take weeks. For the handler, it also helps to claim the space as you walk away from the dog, cross in front of the dog between the first obstacle and the dog, keeping the front of your body facing the dog (keeping eye contact). Keep telling the dog to stay. Stand still and go back again, leash on treat and walk away. Eventually you will let the dog come to you (face the direction you will be going), taking the first obstacle and getting a treat. PUT THE LEASH ON AND WALK AWAY> Have fun with this, it takes time to train. The dog will mirror you and your own excitment, be calm and be relaxed.

LinB
mdt-Agility Ability LLC
Nevada

Lin,
Thanks for posting this! I am going to try this with my youngest in class when I go back next week! I sure hope it works but he will usually stay in class, its just in the competition ring that's the issue since the rules are "somewhat" different and no treats are involved once we are in the ring. I am also working on other things to help with his self control, but it does not hurt to have many tools in the toolbox to work!

Yvette
Phoenix, AZ

Lin Battaglia

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Re: Startline problems
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2014, 07:37:57 AM »
Good luck Yvette. Keep positive and set yourself up to succeed. There are many other training opportunities and times and places to practice this behavor. Take a Hoop into your house, your garage, front yard, back yard. Drive around with one hoop and stop anywhere you can and practice. Keep him thinking and offer different places where he will have to give you the behavor. Keep calm yourself and make it be fun. Use food and sometimes a toy. Take the stress out of it. You didn't say how old your dog is so that could also be part of it ? Have fun.

Lin
mdt-AA LLC 

LeeAnne McAdam

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Re: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2014, 10:02:03 AM »
Yvette...I know you joined the seminar list so don't forget to work on the "Teaching a Behavior" exercises that we've all been working on, too! :)
Lee Anne

Yvette Cook

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Re: SPECIAL note to all judges and competitors
« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2014, 06:26:25 AM »
Most definitely! Working sits every moment I can!
Yvette
Phoenix, AZ