Author Topic: Gate Stewarding  (Read 3009 times)

Lin Battaglia

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #30 on: February 19, 2014, 09:39:48 AM »
The Gate Stewarding job is very important at all trials. And common sense has be the guide. Perhaps the Trial Chair needs to make clear to Gate Ss which ring takes presidence.

No one has mentioned so far that it isn't a good thing when the Gate S yells the dog's name across the ring to the score table. It can be very distracting to the dog on the line when they hear someone yell their name just as they are about to run. Most people here know all the dogs but if not, we ask the handler to turn to the table and tell them the dogs name. Works great. The Gate S tells the hanlder when they step in the ring to give the dogs name to the table. Less stress without all the yelling. Being at the gate on time is the handlers responsiblity. We don't yell for dogs. The Gate S simply lines them up and keeps the que area free of dogs not running.

The Gate S keeps the trial moving along. There should be no specail treatment because they know one dog doesn't like the previous running dog or can't follow their friends dog or can't run before the other dog in their household etc etc...We expect people to run in the order posted unless they have more than one dog in the household and have to change out dogs. We have people with only one dog that can never seem to get to the line in time. It's frustrating. 

The Gate S can be helpful to the judge. Judges are very busy watching dogs coming and going but I think it's helpful if the Gate S can keep the run out area clear of other dogs. It's just common sense again. Also, pointing out to the leash runner when it's safe and not distracting to carry the leash across the ring.

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A Jussero

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2014, 10:54:04 AM »
I like the three box line up system and both my highly anxious dogs (one is also quite vocal) have learned to be comfortable in these enclosed boxes while waiting.  Unfortunately, this does take space that may not be available to some facilities.  In that case, a gate steward who can holler out and keeps the running dogs marked off in color is appreciated so that congestion doesn't build. 
Ann J.

gm5bkc

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2014, 08:01:32 AM »
Because my dog Katie gets nervous waiting around in line, I try to stand off to the side, play with her  and watch the list getting crossed off.  So not blocking the view and crossing off runs with a big, thick marker are important to me :-)

But not all Gate Stewards can do it that way, some need to be close to the board to read the lists themselves!  Other competitors could sure help by not crowding around, though.
Glenn, Merri, Hildie IJC, WV-I
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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #33 on: February 20, 2014, 12:30:22 PM »

No one has mentioned so far that it isn't a good thing when the Gate S yells the dog's name across the ring to the score table. It can be very distracting to the dog on the line when they hear someone yell their name just as they are about to run.

T

Funny that you mentioned this, at Champs in 2011, for the first few runs, Lily kept looking around as she heard her name over the loudspeaker when Ken and company were talking about her.... ;D
Audri, Lily, Cee Cee and Toto, Calypso

Leanne

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2014, 02:39:08 PM »

No one has mentioned so far that it isn't a good thing when the Gate S yells the dog's name across the ring to the score table. It can be very distracting to the dog on the line when they hear someone yell their name just as they are about to run.

T

Advantage Deaf Dogs!!!   I just knew there had to be an advantage out there somewhere!!  LOL
Leanne
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DeafSheltieMom

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2014, 05:50:05 PM »

No one has mentioned so far that it isn't a good thing when the Gate S yells the dog's name across the ring to the score table. It can be very distracting to the dog on the line when they hear someone yell their name just as they are about to run.

T

Advantage Deaf Dogs!!!   I just knew there had to be an advantage out there somewhere!!  LOL

Hee hee!  Yup, yup!!  As a matter of fact, there are quite a few advantages of running a deaf dog, including my dog not hearing the announcer at Champs, nor hearing me talking back to said announcer, nor hearing me going "doh!" at myself many, many times...   ;D   He just stays happy!
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Karen K

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #36 on: February 26, 2014, 08:15:00 AM »
Sharon --

I have a question regarding entering the ring while the other dog is running. I also sometimes hold back when I'm running Case. He barks loudly and consistently until I have him sitting at the start. Unless I know the dog in front of me and know that s/he is super stable and focused, I wait so that Case doesn't disrupt their run with his barking. I set up quickly and go, but my purpose in waiting is the previous dog's run. It doesn't seem fair for them to handle the course and a barking dog. (And yes, I have done all I can to stop him and he now stops once he sits, but that doesn't help the previous team.) He is in no way aggressive or threatening, but I suspect he is annoying. And I have seen running dogs turn to look, which is why I started.

Still go ahead when I'm running NADAC?

atom/andy

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #37 on: February 27, 2014, 10:02:31 PM »
Totally agree with Sharon.  A 'yeller' at the gate affects the tone of the trial.

Alanna


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Being hearing impaired I do love them ;-)
fortunately my partner does respond to his name instantly
and this alerts me to situation.

Andy&Atom

Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2014, 08:27:21 PM »
I agree with Al.   No matter what style the gate uses, someone is not going to be happy,  :o and the wide variety of opinions expressed here confirm that!

I have always been mystified by the people who go up to the gate board and stare at it for minutes as if the board will tell them how to run the course.  Pretty soon there is a whole group meditating for divine guidance, and not even the gate can see the board.

I had never heard the rule about being eliminated if you you didn't step out when the gate told you to. I have never seen a problem, but I have seen courses that have an off-course that wiil bring the running dog right into the dog at the start line, so I hope the judge will take things like that into consideration.
Sheila & the Shelties

Karen Echternacht

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2014, 04:58:05 PM »
Sharon, not to beat a dead horse because I understand and agree with getting to the line....but for clarification are you saying it is up to the gate to let the Judge know that there was an intentional "lagging" to get into the ring if the next dog is not set up and ready to go?  I guess I'm asking whose responsibility is it...the gate to proactively let the judge know or the judge to ask why there is not a dog ready to go?


Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2014, 10:04:53 PM »
This is a quote from Sharon:

If a handler does not enter the ring when asked, they can be and should be eliminated.   If entering a ring puts them in a dangerous situation then either that team should not be competing or the team that ran right before them should not be competing.

A judge tells the gate steward when they want the next team to enter the ring.  If the team refuses to enter when told, they are supposed to indicate to the judge that the team refused to enter.  The team should be eliminated for not entering the ring.  If the handler explains that they are afraid of the previous team, then the judge will talk to that team to find out just which dog of the two teams seems "dangerous".

If a dog and handler cannot enter the ring in a controlled manner and be safe doing so, then NADAC is not the best pick as a venue.  NADAC is very strict about aggressive dogs, dangerous dogs and out of control dogs not being allowed to compete.

If a competitor feels that their dog is at risk because of another dog at the trial, then they should send a letter of concern to NADAC and we will contact the other team and let them know that there are some concerns about their dog's potential behavior.  Sometimes everyone stays quiet when they know for a fact that a particular dog is dangerous to others at the finish or the start.  The competitors should also help in reporting the dogs in question and maybe the owners will work on getting more control over their dogs.  If no one ever says anything, then more and more dangerous dogs will be competing.

At a NADAC trial it is "mandatory" that the entering dog must be in the ring before the finishing dog leaves the ring.  They are not to remove their leash until directed to do so by the "Good luck" indicator, but they must be inside the ring area before the previous dog leaves the ring.  Anyone not complying may choose to wait and enter late after the previous dog leaves, but at that time they have chosen an elimination for their run.

Sharon
« Last Edit: March 01, 2014, 10:06:32 PM by Sheila & the Shelties »
Sheila & the Shelties

Amber Fountain

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #41 on: March 02, 2014, 04:12:54 PM »
Sharon,

What if the dog is the first after a jump height change? Braddock is often first in 8", and I will sometimes wait until the ring crew at least starts changing the jumps before we walk out. If a dog is the first after a jump height change, should the still head out while the other team is finishing up?


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Amber, Braddock, and Magic
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Sharon Nelson

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2014, 10:18:57 PM »
Sharon --

I have a question regarding entering the ring while the other dog is running. I also sometimes hold back when I'm running Case. He barks loudly and consistently until I have him sitting at the start. Unless I know the dog in front of me and know that s/he is super stable and focused, I wait so that Case doesn't disrupt their run with his barking. I set up quickly and go, but my purpose in waiting is the previous dog's run. It doesn't seem fair for them to handle the course and a barking dog. (And yes, I have done all I can to stop him and he now stops once he sits, but that doesn't help the previous team.) He is in no way aggressive or threatening, but I suspect he is annoying. And I have seen running dogs turn to look, which is why I started.

Still go ahead when I'm running NADAC?

If the gate steward instructs you to, yes......... you might tell them that your dog barks loudly and they will probably hold you and then indicate to the judge that you are okay and not refusing to enter the ring.

Sharon
Sharon
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Sharon Nelson

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Re: Gate Stewarding
« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2014, 10:23:28 PM »
Sharon, not to beat a dead horse because I understand and agree with getting to the line....but for clarification are you saying it is up to the gate to let the Judge know that there was an intentional "lagging" to get into the ring if the next dog is not set up and ready to go?  I guess I'm asking whose responsibility is it...the gate to proactively let the judge know or the judge to ask why there is not a dog ready to go?

The gate steward should let the judge if a competitor is refusing to enter the ring.  There can be many situations where the handler is not in the ring, but it is not because they are refusing to enter when told.

Sharon
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