Author Topic: Why so few men In agility  (Read 6087 times)

Merri

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2012, 03:12:11 PM »
Maybe the perspective is cultural/geographical.  I rode in the Southern US and also in Bermuda.  There were very, very few men at the stables or even at the competitive horse shows.  Yes, I see more men in the equestrian events televised on television today (so a higher level) but in the daily life of the average rider in those locations, there were few men in 1960s-1970s .  The instructors were also almost exclusively women.  In the young years, the girls I knew, including myself, all had dog, horse and other animal toys but the boys seemed to play with other toys.  It seems a natural progression to playing with horse and dog toys to riding real horses and doing things with real dogs.

Your observation about more men at more competitive equestrian levels brings up an intriguing insight to ponder.

Merri Crawford

Cherie Singer

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2012, 04:40:46 PM »
My husband comes to most agility trials, volunteers his time working and actually likes the social aspects of it.  And the beer.  We do have beer (and wine, and many other things) at the trials out here at the end of the day! 

I asked him once why he doesn't want to run a dog since we have several dogs that could run with him and he has been known to run a course every now and then.  He told me that if he can't 'win', he doesn't want to run.  He can actually tell you how many Q's he has earned with various dogs over the years.  He is very goal oriented in that respect. And I don't really stress about my Q percentage.  I record points and keep track of titles but that is not why I do this crazy thing we all do.

I think one aspect of this that hasn't been mentioned is that many (not all) women who do agility do not have children or have grown children.  So training dogs becomes a nurturing outlet for us.  I know it is for me.  It is not that men can't be nurturing and patient.  I just think that for many men, it is just not a priority that drives them.

I for one applaud all the men that enjoy the sport.  They are not just good for moving A-frames and tunnels.  Just like different types of dogs makes life interesting, meeting different people keeps things fun too.
Cherie & the Singer Shelties

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2012, 04:41:51 PM »
It also seems that by percentage there are more men at the higher level of agility than you see at local events.
It not the dogs fault stupid!

TheQuestKnight

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #33 on: May 30, 2012, 05:06:56 PM »
OK, my third post and I'm taking the Bill Maher approach . . . NOT writing in general terms; but in terms specific to me . . .

I ONLY do agility with my dogs NOW for "US" . . . we DON'T do it for Qs or titles . . . we've got plenty of those; and besides . . . no one else really cares . . .

I trial for the challenge that it presents to us and the opportunity to learn our weaknesses so that we can improve because that's my goal . . . and I've imparted, I believe, that same work ethic to my canine partners . . .

I DON'T do agility for it's social aspects . . . with the exception of a small group of "very special to me people" . . . I'm at a trial to run with my dog(s) . . . learn . . . spend time with my dogs . . . and wait for the trial to end so I can go back to my motel room and watch sports or a movie while sharing Schezwan or Hunan Chinese food with my dogs . . .

ALL that I desire is an efficiently run trial . . . coffee on site or close by . . . if there happen to be "special to me" folks in attendance, that's GREAT . . . if not . . . I'm totally fine listening to the radio in my van and petting my dogs . . .

At the risk of generalizing, women like the social aspect of the trial . . . they like watching others run . . . and I could absolutely care less . . . I don't care if others celebrate our runs because we know when we've accomplished something . . . so I don't hang out ringside to cheer on people that I don't know, that could care less about me . . . and that I'm really not all that motivated to get to know . . .

For me, an agility trial is still a TEST of SKILLS measured against a standard of performance . . .

That's how I am . . . that's how my BCs are . . . and I ONLY trial where I and mine can be me and us . . .

I DEARLY LOVE seeing my agility friends at a trial . . . but I also march to the beat of my own different drummer . . .

Beer won't bring me to an agility trial . . . good wine will . . .

I guess that I'm about as social as a "Honey Badger" . . . you kind of have to be another "Honey Badger" to pique my interest when it comes to a friendly relationship . . .

Other than that, I am what I am and that's all that I am . . .

Al & Pellinore in Ohio 

Castle Camelot: Al, Barb, Dred, Gael & Pellinore . . . and from The Bridge Grill & Pub,  Kali, Flurry, Promise, Chico, Romulus, Trix and Tony.

auzyhrd

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Why so few men In agility
« Reply #34 on: May 30, 2012, 06:30:59 PM »
I loved Jeff's comments and have to agree with Cherie as my dearly beloved,      Chuck, has said the same thing. His comment was, "There's no guarantee I would win and what's the point in anything less." He has a hard time understanding how I can be happy with an NQ run.

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #35 on: May 30, 2012, 08:30:55 PM »
Al are you my long lost  brother almost all the things you said sound like I said them. I however can not be satisfied competing against an standard like a Q, Par, or DRI.  I can measure my progress by these things but unless I beat someone head to head. I can not fell truly that I have achieved. No Gizmo on the other hand could care less.  By they way I will be attending a trail in Ohio the end of June. Maybe I will see you there.

I hope most of you understood the Beer comment was tongue in cheek. I love agility and NADAC, CPE and TEA CUP all for different reasons. I will run it no mater if I am the only man who does. I was just wondering why other men do not seem to become involve.   
It not the dogs fault stupid!

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #36 on: May 31, 2012, 02:48:16 AM »
It also seems that by percentage there are more men at the higher level of agility than you see at local events.

Yes, I've notice that in a lot of organizations.  More women at the lower levels, but more men in a lot of the higher levels.  That's why I wondered the proportion of women judges to men.

And all agility men are manly men!
Sheila & the Shelties

James Bell

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Why so few men In agility
« Reply #37 on: May 31, 2012, 07:29:00 AM »
Jeff, I seem to remember us discussing the same thing a few years ago, that men always come into class stiff and easily embarrassed. And the ones that stick around not only learn to be silly and publicly embarrassing, but learn to enjoy it. Of course, ladies, be careful what you wish for, as that attitude transfers to other environs. :-)
James Bell

Amy McGovern

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #38 on: May 31, 2012, 09:03:21 AM »
When we started in agility, we had one dog (Ada) and no child.  My husband and I split the runs evenly.  He really loved the strategy courses like gamblers and specialized in those types of runs.  When I was pregnant, he took over running the dog and I trained the new dog.  At age 4, our son started running my husband's dog.  He eventually ran her in all classes except chances and even ran her in champs last year.  When she died last fall, my husband stopped running altogether even though we had two more dogs to run.  I asked him why last night and he said it just got boring.  He really misses the strategy games as he loved thinking on his feet in the ring.  So now he does support for my son and I as we run at shows.  So I do have a male running but he is a junior handler :)  Maybe someday we can convince my husband to run again? 
Amy and the schnauzers

Ed and Dino

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #39 on: May 31, 2012, 10:25:13 AM »
... I however can not be satisfied competing against an standard like a Q, Par, or DRI.  I can measure my progress by these things but unless I beat someone head to head. I can not fell truly that I have achieved.
...

I hope most of you understood the Beer comment was tongue in cheek. ...   

I don't have that man thing about beating someone else. I understand what you are saying but it does not apply to agility nor many other things in life for me. In many trials, Dino has always been in a class by himself. Whether we Q or do not Q often we are in 1st place. So I'm with Al that it is more of having a run that meets your personal standards (for me fun and team work) and if in addition you get a Q so much the better.

And your beer comment is actually a valid point, beer is an important item in many man caves and man activities.
It is no joke.
Ed & Dino (At the Bridge)
Morristown, NJ

TheQuestKnight

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #40 on: May 31, 2012, 10:37:02 AM »
Hi Dave,

If the Ohio trial that you refer to is NODT's Dog Days, I and mine won't be there . . .

It's a nice, recently on the small side, rural, hometown trial.  It's a nice outdoor site with a fair amount of shade . . . unfortunately, in recent years, it has also been HOT & HU-MID!!!  Unfortunately, our two older dogs just don't handle the heat and humidity that well anymore, so we've been taking the Summer months off the past several years.

It is a multi-venue trial, which is nice, because there is always something going on to watch and learn something new about something different.  If there is a "negative", there are generally conflicts and delays due to handlers exhibiting in multiple venues and/or multiple disciplines (agility, obedience and/or conformation).

Bear in mind that UKC is a STICKLER about there being no alcohol on the grounds . . . and since the grounds are "shared", that rule covers ALL of the grounds and rings . . .

I've had some recent injuries from falling off of our roof last Fall that have impacted my mobility, so my Pellinore and I are learning how to do "old things", new ways . . . and we both still have tendencies to fall back into old habits that create some problems on course! <LOL>

Anymore, I just look at a course knowing that I want to try some new things that we're working on . . . a particular sequence that I'd like to be able to handle at some distance or . . . whatever . . . 

So each course has several real important goals to me for where Pelli and I are at this stage of our game . . . and achieving any one of them is AWESOME!!!  When they all come together for us in one run . . . well, it just doesn't get any better than that!!!

I dunno . . . I've been around this wonderful sport for over 20 years . . . did A LOT of things in A LOT of places because of what this sport gave me . . . and I went through my "needing to win" phase and my late Kali was just as driven as I was.  When she passed away, that needing to win "spirit" left . . . I'd have traded everything for one more totally crappy run with her where she bit me in the arse <G> . . . the silly little things that we remember most! <LOL>

I can't and won't try to speak for other men . . . I started by maintaining and building agility equipment when my club at the time was still "barnstorming" local fairs, picnics, etc. showing off this new sport called agility . . .

I got involved when my late Kali REFUSED to run for my wife . . . competition for the same boy's attention, don'cha know? <LOL>  With Kali, I finally learned that I couldn't take PLAYING a game "seriously" . . .

Taking the sport "seriously" is what almost drove me totally away from the sport 8 years ago . . . just doing it FOR FUN with my own goals refocused me . . .

I guess that you can cue up Sinatra's "My Way" . . .

Safe travels and best wishes for success!!!

Al & Pellinore

 
Castle Camelot: Al, Barb, Dred, Gael & Pellinore . . . and from The Bridge Grill & Pub,  Kali, Flurry, Promise, Chico, Romulus, Trix and Tony.

Lori Pritchett

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Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #41 on: May 31, 2012, 12:15:19 PM »
NADAC Agility: where the women are strong, the men are good looking, and the dogs are above average .....

Now I want a t-shirt with that!

Cindy and the Beagles

I'm with you Cindy!  In purple too....
Lori

C-ATCH B.E.T. on Me Mooses Are Wild (Moose)
Running L Bel Canto Zaffira (Bella)

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #42 on: May 31, 2012, 08:04:40 PM »
NADAC Agility: where the women are strong, the men are good looking, and the dogs are above average .....

Now I want a t-shirt with that!

Cindy and the Beagles

Me to how about hot pink

I'm with you Cindy!  In purple too....
It not the dogs fault stupid!

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #43 on: May 31, 2012, 08:52:39 PM »
I think this article kinda sums up what we all have been saying in different ways:  http://ezinearticles.com/?Should-Women-Rule-the-World?&id=5740813

I don't know that I agree with the conclusion.  I've worked in male-dominated jobs, as well as jobs where the employees are primarily female.  Men may have their issues, but so do women!
Sheila & the Shelties

Re: Why so few men In agility
« Reply #44 on: May 31, 2012, 09:23:38 PM »
I think this article kinda sums up what we all have been saying in different ways:  http://ezinearticles.com/?Should-Women-Rule-the-World?&id=5740813

I don't know that I agree with the conclusion.  I've worked in male-dominated jobs, as well as jobs where the employees are primarily female.  Men may have their issues, but so do women!

One Paragraph from the article

At an early age, boys can be up to 50 times more competitive, while girls tend to be much more cooperative. Boys will often look for an "adversary" in their games. Girls generally prefer games that involve nurturing. They also take turns much more often, even at an early age. These trends continue in later life. Women use conversations to develop and maintain relationships. What they discuss is often not as important as the fact that they are communicating. Men prefer to share activities, rather than thoughts or feelings, with their friends

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5740813

Competitiveness yes me to a T.  I and I think most men are task focus Many times at work it is very hard for me not to say to the women at the meeting can we stop talking and get something done. Very true men share activities without thinking or feelings.

Not sure how this makes agility a womens game. 

 
It not the dogs fault stupid!