Author Topic: Teeter  (Read 3709 times)

Amy McGovern

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #45 on: August 06, 2018, 08:31:54 PM »
Actually we found all the dogs did the lower teeter  with no issues.   They all got it on the first try quite nicely,  and that was after running over a full height teeter multiple times. 

Itís more of a perception issue for handlers then an issue for the dogs


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Agreed with this.  The teacup teeter is lower and the dogs I see generally have no issues with it.  Yes, the dogs are "smaller" dogs but teacup takes up to 16 or 20" these days (depends on the club) so the dogs are not just tiny. 

-Amy
Amy and the schnauzers

KellyDittmar

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #46 on: August 12, 2018, 07:46:05 PM »
Actually we found all the dogs did the lower teeter  with no issues.   They all got it on the first try quite nicely,  and that was after running over a full height teeter multiple times. 

Itís more of a perception issue for handlers then an issue for the dogs

And we all know the world today... there's more complaining from people who are afraid and won't try it than from those who have done it successfully...

I think making a teeter with a 12" fulcrum or some other very different fulcrum than the teeters in use in other venues would discourage those of us who love doing multiple venues, and it would definitely discourage people from other venues to coming out and trying NADAC, which is an expressed goal in the recent announced rule changes.  Better to do without than to make it a baby teeter.

I agree with this 100% - you'd be more likely to drive people away than bring them in if they are worried that this different teeter will mess with their current teeter performance.

Kelly from MN
Kelly Dittmar
Sam & Jake
Minnesota

Jodi Schmidt

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #47 on: August 23, 2018, 10:12:10 AM »
The issue was mainly the concussion.

In order to allow the teeter to even be able to drop for the small dogs it meant it had very little counter weight for the large dogs.   And since people train their dogs to run to the tip of the teeter and slam it down, it causes a LOT of strain on the dogs joints.

You could counter weight it, but then it becomes an issue of having it being accurate across multiple trials.    I'm sure Sharon can chime in if I missed some other key points as well, since I will be honest in that I don't remember that period too well :)

I can testify that even a breakaway tire, while a great improvement, is still a pretty bad obstacle.    Speaking from experience of having my own dog nearly choked when she got hung up in one.      The circle breaking away is great, but that doesn't stop a dog from getting hung up in the chains supporting that circle.    Even as recently as last year I had seen a video of a dog getting caught up in the chains and causing a not so great injury.
Is it worth the risk having that obstacle, for what purpose?    If we want to test jumping we can do that on a jump.

^^^^ This right here, what Chris said about the Tire is so accurate ! I agree with this 100%. Itís not worth it at all imo ! Safety comes first for me and this is why I love NADAC so much.

John H. Gooldy

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #48 on: August 27, 2018, 04:39:05 PM »
Chris are you looking at the clip and go teeter? We have used it and it is quality but pricey.
John and Ida Gooldy
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James Bell

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #49 on: September 21, 2018, 04:47:23 AM »
As Chris described, the main issue was concussion and career ending injury, or IOW the issue was crappy training due to crappy criteria.

I've said for over a decade that the only way to make it safe was to CHANGE THE CRITERIA. Shorten the contact patch drastically (or reverse it), then if your dog has even a toenail in the contact area BEFORE the teeter touches ground, your dog faulted the obstacle. This enforces HANDLING and TRAINING of the obstacle. Dog must handle the teeter safely, tipping it in a reasonable manner, before they may leave the obstacle without fault. Tada! No more flyoffs, no more having to screw around with weights to deal with different weight dogs. Just a safe but fun obstacle. IMNSHO. :-)

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James Bell

Re: Teeter
« Reply #50 on: September 21, 2018, 12:33:18 PM »
As Chris described, the main issue was concussion and career ending injury, or IOW the issue was crappy training due to crappy criteria.

I've said for over a decade that the only way to make it safe was to CHANGE THE CRITERIA. Shorten the contact patch drastically (or reverse it), then if your dog has even a toenail in the contact area BEFORE the teeter touches ground, your dog faulted the obstacle. This enforces HANDLING and TRAINING of the obstacle. Dog must handle the teeter safely, tipping it in a reasonable manner, before they may leave the obstacle without fault. Tada! No more flyoffs, no more having to screw around with weights to deal with different weight dogs. Just a safe but fun obstacle. IMNSHO. :-)

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You can't fault dogs for being in the contact area.  My small dog who only weighs around 11 lbs HAS to go to the VERY end of the teeter in order for it to tip for him.  Some people teach their dog to go to the end and ride it down for medium size dogs.  That is what my 25 lb dog does and she doesn't hit hard.  I understand handling it in a reasonable manner, but that was why it was taken away in the first place.  People were complaining that they were being faulted even though their dog hit the yellow.  They were sending their large dogs to the end and the teeter was slamming down. 

Secondly, if you have a difference in the teeter from other organizations, you will have issues with that.  There are already issues because of the no slats and the fact that some clubs only have a white stripe on the bottom of the A-frame.  I realize it is a training issue, but if they don't have to deal with it in other venues, then why bother with NADAC? 

The teeter itself isn't the issue, the issue is the difference in the teeters throughout clubs.  There is no consistency in how fast or hard they descend.  The Clip and Go teeter that I saw eliminated that issue. 
 
Audri, Lily, Cee Cee and Toto, Calypso

Chris Nelson

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Re: Teeter
« Reply #51 on: September 21, 2018, 02:07:00 PM »
Itís important to note the clip and go teeter does nothing to regulate the drop rate.

It only eliminates the board whip from a teeter slamming down.   The concussion and drop speed is no different then any other teeter.


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